Leadership Class

Leadership is the ability to lead, guide, or direct others to accomplish a common goal.
We all need to sharpen our leadership skills so that we can lead others to Jesus.

Join us on Tuesday nights starting          
In The Sanctuary
6:30 pm to 8:30 pm

Pastor Andrew is using Romans 12 as the foundation for our study on how to be better leaders and better followers of Jesus!

Romans 12

Living Sacrifices to God

 1 I beseech you therefore, brethren, by the mercies of God, that you present your bodies a living sacrifice, holy, acceptable to God, which is your reasonable service. 2 And do not be conformed to this world, but be transformed by the renewing of your mind, that you may prove what is that good and acceptable and perfect will of God.
Serve God with Spiritual Gifts
  
3 For I say, through the grace given to me, to everyone who is among you, not to think of himself more highly than he ought to think, but to think soberly, as God has dealt to each one a measure of faith. 4 For as we have many members in one body, but all the members do not have the same function, 5 so we, being many, are one body in Christ, and individually members of one another. 6 Having then gifts differing according to the grace that is given to us, let us use them: if prophecy, let us prophesy in proportion to our faith; 7 or ministry, let us use it in our ministering; he who teaches, in teaching; 8 he who exhorts, in exhortation; he who gives, with liberality; he who leads, with diligence; he who shows mercy, with cheerfulness.
Behave Like a Christian
  
9 Let love be without hypocrisy. Abhor what is evil. Cling to what is good. 10 Be kindly affectionate to one another with brotherly love, in honor giving preference to one another; 11 not lagging in diligence, fervent in spirit, serving the Lord; 12 rejoicing in hope, patient in tribulation, continuing steadfastly in prayer; 13 distributing to the needs of the saints, given to hospitality.

14 Bless those who persecute you; bless and do not curse. 15 Rejoice with those who rejoice, and weep with those who weep. 16 Be of the same mind toward one another. Do not set your mind on high things, but associate with the humble. Do not be wise in your own opinion.

17 Repay no one evil for evil. Have regard for good things in the sight of all men. 18 If it is possible, as much as depends on you, live peaceably with all men. 19 Beloved, do not avenge yourselves, but rather give place to wrath; for it is written, “Vengeance is Mine, I will repay,”[a] says the Lord. 20 Therefore “ If your enemy is hungry, feed him;If he is thirsty, give him a drink;For in so doing you will heap coals of fire on his head.”[b]

21 Do not be overcome by evil, but overcome evil with good.

Advertisements

Leadership Attribute – #19

Servanthood:  To Get Ahead, Put Others First

You’ve got to love your people more than your position.
– John C. Maxwell

When you think of servanthood, do you envision it as an activity performed by relatively low-skilled people at the bottom of the positional totem pole?  If you do, you have the wrong impression.  Servanthood is not about position or skill. It’s about attitude.  You have undoubtedly met people in service position who have poor attitudes toward servanthood:  the rude worker at the government agency, the waiter who can’t be bothered with taking your order, the store clerk who talks on the phone with a friend instead of helping you. 

Just as you can sense when a worker doesn’t want to help people, you can just as easily detect whether a leader has a servant’s heart.  And the truth is that the best leaders desire to serve others, not themselves.  What does it mean to embody the quality of servanthood?  A true servant leader:

  • Puts Others Ahead of His Own Agenda – The first mark of servanthood is the ability to put others ahead of yourself and your personal desires.  It is more than being willing to put your agenda on hold.  It means intentionally being aware of your people’s needs, available to help them, and able to accept their desires as important.
  • Possesses the Confidence to Serve – The real heart of servanthood is security.  Show me someone who thinks he is too important to serve, and I’ll show you someone who is basically insecure. How we treat others is really a reflection of how we think about ourselves.  Only secure leaders give power to others.  It’s also true that only secure leaders exhibit servanthood.
  • Initiates Service to Others – Just about anyone will serve if compelled to do so.  And some will serve in a crisis.  But you can really see the heart of someone who initiates service to others.  Great leaders see the need, seize the opportunity, and serve without expecting anything in return.
  • Is Not Position–Conscious – Servant leaders don’t focus on rank or position.  They are one person trying to help another.  If anything, being a leaders gives them a greater sense of obligation to serve.
  • Serves Out of Love – Servanthood is not motivated by manipulation or self-promotion.  It is fueled by love.  In the end, the extent of your influences depends on the depth of your concern for others.  That’s why it’s so important for leaders to be willing to serve.

Reflecion

Where is your heart when it comes to serving others?  Do you desire to become a leader for the perks and benefits?  Or are you motivated by a desire to help others?  If you really want to become the kind of leader that people want to follow, you will have to settle the issue of servanthood.  If your attitude is to be served rather than to serve, you may be headed for trouble.  If this is an issue in your life, then heed this advice:

  •  Stop lording over people, and start listening to them.
  •  Stop role-playing for advancement, and start risking for others’ benefit.
  • Stop seeking your own way, and start serving others.

It is true that those who would be great must be like the least and the servant of all.

Action Steps

To improve your servanthood, do the following:

  • Perform small acts – When was the last time you performed small acts of kindness for others?  Start with those closest to you:  your spouse, children, parents.  Find ways today to do small things that show others you care.
  • Learn to walk slowly through the crowd – One of the greatest lessons I learned as a young leader came from my father.  I call it walking slowly through the crowd.  The next time you attend a function with a number of clients, colleagues, or employees, make it your goal to connect with others by circulating among them and talking to people.  Focus on each person you meet.  Learn his name if you don’t know it already.  Make your agenda getting to know each person’s needs, wants, and desires.  Then later when you go home, make a note to yourself to do something beneficial for half a dozen of those people.
  • Move into action  –  If an attitude of servanthood is conspicuously absent from your life, the best way to change it is to start serving.  Begin serving with your body, and your heart will eventually catch up.  Sign up to serve others for six months at your church, a community agency, or a volunteer organization.  If your attitude still isn’t good at the end of your term, do it again.  Keep at it until your heart changes.

Take Away

Albert Schweitzer wisely stated, “I don’t know what your destiny will be, but one thing I know:  The ones among you who will be really happy are those who have sought and found how to serve.”  If you want to lead on the highest level, be willing to serve on the lowest.

Whoever wants to become great among you must be your servant, and whoever wants to be first must be your slave— just as the Son of Man did not come to be served, but to serve, and to give his life as a ransom for many. (Matthew 20:26-28)

Attributes of a Leader – #11

Listening:  To Connect with Their Hearts, Use Your Ears

A good leader encourages followers to tell him what he needs to know, not what he wants to heart.
– John C. Maxwell

In The 21 Irrefutable Laws of Leadership, John Maxwell states that leaders must touch a heart before they ask for a hand.  That’s the Law of Connection.  But before a leader can touch a person’s heart, he must know what is in it.  He learns that by listening.  An unwillingness to listen is too common among poor leaders.  A large percentage of management problems are the result of faulty communication and the overwhelming majority of communication problems stem from poor listening. 

A lot of voices are clamoring for your attention.  As you think about how to spend your listening time, keep in mind that you have two purposes for listening:  to connect with people and to learn.  For that reason, you should keep your ear open to these people:

  • Your Followers – Good leaders do more than conduct business when they interact with followers.  They take the time to get a feel for who each one is as a person.  If you’re in the habit of listening only to the facts and not the person who expresses them, change your focus- and really listen.
  • Your  Customers – Too many leaders are so caught up in their own ideas that they never hear their customers’ concerns, complaints, and suggestions.  Good leaders always make it a priority to keep in contact with the people they are serving.
  • Your Competitors – When a leader sees another organization as competition, he focuses his attention on building his own case or championing his cause and forgets to learn from what the other group is doing.  As a leader, you don’t want to base your actions on what the other guy is doing, but you should still listen and learn what you can to improve yourself.
  • Your Mentors – No leader is so advanced or experienced that he can afford to be without a mentor.  If you don’t already have a mentor, go out and find one.  If you can’t get someone to help you in person, begin the process by reading books. 

Reflection

Are you a good listener?  I know when I started in leadership, I wasn’t.  I was too busy doing my own thing and trying to make things happen.  But once I slowed down and paid greater attention to what was going on around me, I found that my activity had sharper focus and accomplished more.  When was the last time you really paid close attention to people and what they have to say?  Do more than just grab onto facts.  Start listening not only for words, but also for feelings, meanings, and undercurrents.

Action Steps

To improve your listening, do the following:

  •  Change your schedule – Do you spend time listening to your followers, customers, competitors, and mentors?  If you don’t have all four groups on your calendar regularly, you’re probably not giving them enough attention.  Pencil in time for each of them on a daily, weekly, or monthly basis. 
  • Meet people on their turf – A key to being a good listener is to find common ground with people.  The next time you meet with an employee or customer, discipline yourself to ask four or five questions about him as a person.  Get to know who he is, and seek common ground to build your connection with him.
  •  Listen between the lines – As you interact with people, you certainly want to pay attention to the factual content of the conversation.  But don’t ignore the emotional content.  Sometimes you can learn more about what’s really going on by reading between the lines.  Spend some time in the coming days and weeks listening with your heart.

Take Away

The only way to find out what you’re missing is to start listening.  Many times we listen with ‘one ear’ while we are putting a shopping list together with the other, or thinking about what we are going to say next.  When someone else is talking, give them your full attention … try it … see what a difference in makes.

My sheep listen to my voice:  I know them, and they follow me.  I give them eternal life, and they shall never perish; no one can snatch them out of my hand.  (John 10:27, 28)

Improving Your Communication Skills

From the book, How to Win Friends and Influence People, by Dale Carnegie. 

The principles recommended are:

  1. Don’t criticize, condemn or complain. Instead of condemning people, let’s try to understand them, a lot more profitable and intriguing than criticism: and it breeds sympathy, tolerance and kindness.
  2. Give honest and sincere appreciation. Be “hearty in your approbation and lavish in your praise and people will cherish your words and treasure them and repeat them over a lifetime-repeat them years after you had forgotten them.”
  3. Arouse in the other person an eager want. “Self expression is the dominant necessity of human nature. When we have a brilliant idea, instead of making others think it is our, let them stir the idea themselves, they will the regard it as their own and they will like it, and maybe eat a couple helpings of it.”
  4. Become genuinely interested in other people. If you want others to like you, if you want to develop real friendships, if you want to help others, at the same time as you help yourself, keep this principle in mind.
  5. Smile. Your smile is a messenger of your goodwill. Your smile brightens the lives of all who see it. To someone who has seen a dozen people frown, scowl or turn their faces away, your smile is like the sun breaking through the clouds.
  6. Remember that a person’s name is to that person the sweetest and most important sound in any language. The information we are imparting or the request we are making, takes on a special importance when we approach the situation with the name of the individual.
  7. Be a good listener. Encourage others to talk about themselves. Remember that the people you are talking to are a hundred times more interested in themselves and their wants and problems than they are in you and your problems.
  8. Talk in terms of the other person’s interest. Talking in terms of the other person’s interest pays off for both parties.
  9. Make the other person feel important – and do in sincerely. Talk to people about themselves and they will listen for hours
  10. The only way to get the best of ;an argument is to avoid it.
  11. Show respect for the other person’s opinions. Never say “you’re wrong.” Don’t argue, instead use diplomacy.
  12. If you are wrong, admit it quickly and emphatically. Remember the old proverb, “by fighting you never get enough, but by yielding, you get more than you expected.”
  13. Begin in a friendly way. Remember what Lincoln said: A drop of honey catches more flies than a gallon of gall.”
  14. Get the other person saying “yes, yes” immediately.
  15. Let the other person do a great deal of talking.
  16. Let the other person feel that the idea is his or hers.
  17. Try honestly to see things from the other person’s point of view. An increased tendency to think always in terms of the other person’s point of view and see things from that person’s angle as well as your own.-if you get only that one thing from this book, it may easily proved to be one of the stepping-stones of your career.
  18. Be sympathetic with the other person’s ideas and desires.
  19. Appeal to their nobler motives. Make people feel that you consider them honest, upright and fair.
  20. Dramatize your ideas.
  21. Throw down a challenge. Every successful person wants a chance of self expression, the chance to prove one’s worth.
  22. Begin with praise and honest appreciation.
  23. Call attention to peoples mistakes indirectly.
  24. Talk about your own mistakes, before criticizing the other person.
  25. Ask questions, instead of giving direct orders.
  26. Let the other person save face.
  27. Praise the slightest improvement and praise every improvement. Be “hearty in your approbation ;and lavish in your praise.”
  28. Give the other person a fine reputation to live up to.
  29. Use encouragement. Make the fault seem easy to correct.
  30. Make the other person happy about doing the thing you suggest. Experience’s of most people show that you are more likely to change attitudes this way.

Maximizing Your Life In 2010

Join us in January for this series on MAXIMIZING your 2010 by gaining understanding in ALL areas of your life.
 
January 10:  Spiritual
January 17:  Emotional
January 24:  Physical
January 31:  Relational        
 
“My people are destroyed for lack of knowledge…”
     Hosea 4:6

 

 

It’s All Because Of Jesus!

Keeping Your Word

commitmentCommit your way to the Lord; trust in him and he will do this:  He will make your righteousness shine like the dawn, the justice of your cause like the noonday sun.
Psalm 37:5,6

On Saturday, I had to have a little life talk with Carson.  Thursday night he had told us that he was going to go to school on Saturday and work a concession stand for one of the games.  It would give him service hours for National Junior Honor Society.  No problem, Bobby said he’d run him over and then go pick him up when he was done.

But we had a full week this past week and had been out on Friday night at a friend’s for dinner, and when Saturday morning rolled around, Carson was tired and decided he didn’t want to get up and go to school to work, he’d rather stay home and hang out with Chase.  And the more Bobby tried to encourage him to go, the more adament Carson became that he didn’t want to.

I asked Carson if he had committed to working this event.  He said, “No”, he’d just told them he might be there. 

I explained to Carson that he could stay home this one time, because he’d not made a commitment, but that it was very important to honor his word, whether he was tired or not.  If he said he was going to do something, he must honor that.

I work with a lot of volunteers at church.  Some are always on time, always doing what they said they would do.  Others … not so much.

Yesterday, our Pastor was talking about our commitments to God.  We make vows with him on Sunday, when we’re caught up in the emotion of the moment … we say, YES LORD, but then by Tuesday or Wednesday, we’ve let life get the best of us and we are back to … “No God, can’t do that right now.”

I want my little Carson to grow into a man of character … in life and with God.

I want to grow into a woman of character … in life and with God.

Father, thank you for teaching me how to be a woman of character.  I want your character, your spirit to fill me up, to flow through me, to flow out of me.  And Jesus, please teach my little Carson the same lesson.

I love you Jesus!
   In Your Name I Pray,
   Amen

It’s All Because Of Jesus!

Give Thanks

Thank_you_smallGratitude is too easily forgotten  in this  me-first society; a world  bent toward a sense of personal entitlement.  Even in the world of churchdom,  it’s easy to blow off expressions of gratitude; after all they are doing this for God, aren’t they?  While that’s the motivation we’re praying for, it doesn’t excuse any of us from being grateful people; reflecting and expressing personal value to others, at every opportunity.

Here’s a few ideas to show thanks to others- guests, members, volunteers and staff, and family:

  • Open your service with “We’re grateful you’ve decided to join us today.” People have options. Lots of options. They chose to come to your church.
  • Express thanks for the contribution people make in giving and volunteering – from the platform,  in the service.
  • Thank people again at the end of service – let them know you appreciate them joining you today.
  • Thank your volunteers with parties and gatherings. 
  • Set aside time each week to let your staff members know how important they are to your team.
  • Tell your volunteers personally how much you value their time, expertise, willingness and unique contribution.
  • Send a letter, make a phone call – thank your first-time guests for joining you for service. Remember, they had options.
  • Spend time during family meals sharing with each other how much you value and appreciate each other.

Look people in the eyes when you share how much you value them.  Let them know you are sincere.  Let them see God’s love through you!

It’s All Because Of Jesus!